2018 SKCE and SKSD co-sponsored the Summer Culture and Language Institute

Teachers, administrators and other staff attended the 2018 Summer Culture and Language Institute from the Salem Keizer School District and other school districts in the area.  This was the second year the Summer Institute was offered and co-sponsored. The curriculum was appreciated last year, and it was reflected in the attendance, which doubled this year.

The Institute began on June 29th and ended on July 3rd. Mornings were spent learning Spanish, and afternoons were spent with speakers presenting on both culture and education equity. Field trips were also provided to schools that have a high ration of Latino students, a neighborhood that illustrated the problems that Latino families must encounter, as well as Latino businesses and organizations.

This Institute is co-sponsored by the Salem Keizer Coalition for Equality and the Salem Keizer School District.

The following slideshow will give an overview of the kinds of activities that school personnel engaged in during the Institute.

 

Every Day 24J! Increase Student Attendence in Salem Keizer School District

Join our campaign to increase student attendance in the Salem Keizer School District!

Únase a nuestra campaña para aumentar la asistencia de los estudiantes en el Distrito Escolar de Salem Keizer!

We are doing lots to increase the attendance of Latino students from immigrant Spanish speaking backgrounds by working with their parents.

Estamos trabajando mucho para aumentar la asistencia de los estudiantes latinos de origen hispano-hablante al trabajar con sus padres.

The local absenteeism rates:

(FRL = Free and Reduced Lunch)

Take a look at these results!

¡Eche un vistazo a estos resultados!

Oregon Community Foundation Awards a 3-Year Grant to SKCE

The Oregon Community Foundation has awarded a 3-year grant to SKCE, beginning in the summer of 2018. The goal is to strengthen the fundraising and marketing capacity for programming that helps spanish speaking parents improve the educational achievement of their children.

The first year award is $30,000, the second year is $25,000 and the third year is $20,000.

Board members Arturo Sarmiento-Linares, Christi Ortiz, Fabiola Camacho, Chris Brantley and Charlie Benitez were on hand to accept the grant award along with Annalivia Palazzo-Angulo, the SKCE Executive Director. Susan fuller, the Oregon Community Foundation volunteer representative, presented the grant award.
(Photo L to R: Arturo Sarmiento-Linares, Christi Ortiz, Fabiola Camacho, Annalivia Palazzo-Angulo, Susan Fuller, Chris Brantley, Charlie Benitez)

Thank you, Oregon Community Foundation!

Thank You Spirit Mountain Community Fund!

On March 14th, 2018, the Spirit Mountain Community Fund awarded a grant to SKCE. Annalivia Palazzo Angulo and Yadira Juarez received the $40,000 award for SKCE. The Spirit Mountain Community Fund awarded this grant to SKCE so that we can, using our Early Learning parent engagement programs, increase the success of Latino students with immigrant backgrounds and Spanish as their home language in the Salem Keizer School District. Thanks to the generosity of the Spirit Mountain Community Fund, these programs will be in several Title I elementary schools in the spring and fall of 2018.

Jack Giffin, Jr., Yadira Juarez, Annalivia Palazzo-Angulo, Sho Dozono, and Mychal Cherry

SKCE Works to Help Parents Reduce the Achievement Gap

There is an achievement gap between ELL (English Language Learners) and Latino students compared to White students in the Salem Keizer School District. Research shows that if struggling readers have not successfully met the achievement skills of their peers by third grade or age nine, we risk losing up to 75% of them to low performance, low attendance rates, failure to graduate, not being ready for college, or dropping out altogether. Our Parent Engagement programs are successful in affecting student success, from pre-school to high school, all of which use culturally relevant methods and curriculum, with Latino Parent facilitators who have the same culture and life experiences as participants.

2017 Improvements in Overall and Latino Student Graduation Rate

The Improvement in the Latino Student Graduation Rate was “impressive”

In a Statesman Journal article, two interviews discussed the improvement in the graduation rates for Oregon students over the last few years. Acting Superintendent for the State of Oregon Department of Education, Colt Gill, and Annalivia Palazzo-Angulo, the Executive Director of SKCE, were interviewed about graduation rates.

Superintendent Gill discussed overall graduation rates and different ways to view the graduation rate data. Annalivia Palazzo-Angulo also discussed graduation rate data, but her information was more specific to the Latino student graduation rate, which was described as an “impressive” gain in the last few years.

“Class of 2017 Graduation” Salem Keizer School District

There was also discussion of how graduation rates change when graduation time is increased beyond 4 years, and when students who graduate through GED, online classes, or other methods are included.

On the Salem Keizer School District website, graduation rates are also discussed. The first paragraph leads to a more in-depth discussion of graduation rates, “According to the Oregon Department of Education’s recently released graduation rates for the 2016-17 academic year, Salem-Keizer Public Schools (SKPS) increased its graduation rate by nearly two percentage points. Additionally, the drop-out rate decreased by nearly one percentage point. The graduation rates were based on a four- and five-year cohort of students entering the ninth grade in the 2013-14 or 12-13 academic year. The dropout rate reports on students in grades 9-12.”

The increase in the number of students graduating was led by the Latino student graduation rate

In 2012, 59.5% of Latino students graduated. In 2017, 72.5% graduated. This is a substantial improvement of 13% in 3 years. Seen in number of students instead of percentages, for every 100 Latino students who should have graduated in 2012, only 59 graduated. However, for every 100 Latino students who should have graduated in 2017, 72 graduated. That’s 13 more out of 100 who graduated in 2017 than graduated in 2012.

Graduation rates must increase for Oregon

However, even with the good news, Oregon didn’t reach a 78% graduation rate. For the present, that means the state Department of Education goal of a 90% graduation rate by 2024 is not on track. (The state legislature has instructed the Oregon Department of Education to have a 100% graduation rate by 2025.) Our graduation rate is currently 49th in the nation.